The Campus LMS: Bound to the System

Regardless of if you teach online, face-to-face, or in a hybrid format you likely have some experience with a Learner Management System (LMS). And, I assume your campus subscribes to one which, technically, means you are supposed to use it.

So let’s talk about that.

First, there are obvious benefits to a campus LMS. For me, the benefit is that it simply exists as an option. So if you know nothing else about technology, or other options, you always have the campus LMS to fall back on. And, if you have issues, you should have tech support to utilize as well.

But the campus LMS, for all the good it’s supposed to do, has its drawbacks. Of course different ones have different features and may be more or less user friendly and to your liking. I get that. But they all do the same thing: they bound us to their system, and they do it in the following ways:

Sets the Structure

An LMS takes control over how your course is structured. This includes what features you can use, how you use them, where they are located, etc…It also dictates how your course looks. The system controls the way things look to you and your students.

Of course any tool that can be utilized as a syllabus or course website is going to do this. For example, I am a huge fan of Wikispaces but using it means that my syllabus and course are going to look particular ways and have particular features. The difference is that when I get to choose a tool like Wikispaces I am making a mindful and conscience decision about how I want my course to look. I’ve played around with Wikispaces. I like how my class website/syllabus looks when I use it. I don’t like how things look when I go into my former university’s LMS (Sakai).

If you have little knowledge about alternative tools to your LMS, or little time to research them, then you are forced into the structure and format of whatever LMS your campus subscribes to. You may like it, you may not, and you may or may not know any better. Which brings me to my next point….

The LMS Has Power

The LMS is now dictating to you what your course looks like, how you and your students function within it, and even how information is communicated. This means that is maintains power over teaching and learning. If you use an LMS mindlessly (i.e. “I use this because that’s what I was told to do”) then you give up any power you had over your course and turn it over to the LMS.

Of course, as I said, any tool you use will shape your course. But if you get to select that tool then you retain your power. You are deciding what you want the course to look like, and you are identifying the tools to make it happen. If the tool doesn’t meet the need for you, then you can drop it and find a new one (or make your own!).

And what if you don’t get to select your own tool? What if you are told you have no options, you are simply not allowed, to use anything BUT the LMS?

Then that is a lot of power and control placed over you, how you teach, and how your students experience their education. And I bet the people who make such decisions don’t even realize it. They don’t realize that what they have done is sanitized teaching and learning.

I’m Not Against the LMS

Least this sound like I am anti-LMS let me state that I’m not. What I am against is being told what tools we must use to accomplish our teaching. If a university wants to subscribe to an LMS then by all means do so. If you are happy with that decision, if the LMS works for you, then please, use it. But I think it’s important to recognize that these systems have power. If we agree with what they have to offer us then that’s fine.

But we need to stop and took a look at what these system say about teaching and learning. Who are they benefiting? What does teaching and learning look like within the system? Are we ok with that? Do we want something more, something different? And will we be able to strike out and utilize tools beyond the LMS?

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Examining The Points-Based Grading System

Recently, I came across this article on point-based grading systems. The ideas in the article were nothing new, and I’m sure you’ve heard most (if not all) before. This includes things like:

  • students expect and are used to points
  • points are not entirely objective
  • points are an extrinsic form of motivation; the goal is to get more points

My take away from this article is that while points-based grading systems have their place, they emphasize the earning of points and de-emphasize learning. Recently, I shared a post where one of my former students wrote about their experiences with my own point-based system. While the author of the points-based post refers to a previous article on how to get students to think more about learning, and less about grades, the ideas fell flat with me.

The truth is, grades matter and they particularly matter at the undergraduate level where students are often thinking ahead to advanced degrees. Students don’t just expect points anymore. They have grown up in a system where they are sort and ranked and tested to death. They have grown up in a high stakes system that emphasizes grades over learning.

Even at the Masters level, I have found that students’ rationale for why they are there is first and foremost a pay increase (totally understandable). At least, that’s what the majority of them have said on the first day of class when asked to share what motivated them to come back to school. Yes, some people put learning first. Most put salary first, and most don’t mention learning.

How Might We Change This?

I think getting students to be more interested in learning and less interested in grades is difficult – especially in higher education. Doing so requires a cultural shift both in how we do things and how students perceive the course and engage with it and each other. Grades are high stakes. And, even if they are not, students are so used to seeing them as such that it’s a common mindset to hold.

If we want students to put learning first, then we have to accept that learning comes with risks. We learn, in part, through trial and error. We learn by taking chances. We learn by struggling. We learn by failing. And none of that is commonly valued in traditional grading systems. The norm is you have one chance to show what you understand. If you take a risk, and you bomb out, you will pay the price.

That’s not what I want.

The Place for Competency Based Education

This is where I think competency based education (CBE) has a chance to play an important role – at least at the graduate level. However, it requires doing some things differently. I could run a CBE course and tell students that an A is earned by acquiring so many competencies, but I don’t think that’s what we want to do. Instead, what I would envision is this:

  • students enter a program and are given a road map for completion.
  • the road map takes stand alone courses and breaks them down into competencies
  • students need to acquire the knowledge relevant to each competency and then demonstrate a particular level of mastery to get it checked off as being met
  • students leave not with a grade (although we could assign them if need be) but a list of competencies they have obtained and the mastery level they obtained each with

Something like this would work well in an online program where teaching and learning could be more fluid if traditional face-to-face meeting times were scrapped. Instructors create content, share readings, and set up ways for students to interact and share work. This could be done through an LMS, a facebook group, twitter chats, and so on.

Getting Started

Doing this kind of work requires a program to let go of traditional semester systems. It means that we have to let go of traditional views on teaching loads in higher education. It does not mean that we overload instructors with students and work to accomplish this idea.

For the last 12 years, I have taught a 2/2 load. While numbers of students within a class vary, it’s reasonable to assume an average of 25. That’s 50 students a semester or 100 a year give or take. If I worked only in the type of program I am laying out here, then let’s say I could be responsible for up to 100 students at a time.

Initially this would be a lot of work. I would have to get everything set up. However, once I did then the work load would decrease to something reasonable. My focus would shift to making sure content was updated and relevant, interacting with students, and providing assistance (and scoring) competencies.

So, in the end, what I’m saying is I don’t think we even need points-based grading systems. Certainly not for everyone. If we want students to focus on learning then we have to make their experiences about learning. In a couple of weeks I will lay out my thoughts on how we can set up a structure to do just that.

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The Problems with Competencies

I’ve been reading College Disrupted: The Great Unbundling of Higher EducationBecause I am in the middle of reading it, this post isn’t meant to be a review of the book (which I am thoroughly enjoying). The point of this post is to bring us back around to discussing issues with competency based education in higher education.

In general, I’m a big fan of seeing what we can do with competency based education (CBE) in higher ed. But, as you can see, I’ve titled this post about the problems with CBE. This isn’t because I truly think CBE is problematic. Instead, I think CBE can cause problems within the existing structures of higher ed (hence the book title – College Disrupted), and I think that while we should recognize these issues we should not let them be reasons to not move forward and see what CBE has to offer.

The Summer Course

I got to this post because I was thinking about a summer course that someone at my new institution will have to teach every year. I have a new job, and while this summer course is not in my contract for me to teach it is a required course that someone has to teach every year. I am a very appropriate person to teach it. FYI: summer pay for teaching a course is not that great, and it’s not exactly on my agenda of things I want to do. Ever.

But, if we assume that it has to be taught, what are the options?

  • someone else can teach it
  • maybe the university would allow an advanced graduate student to teach it
  • i could take the money in exchange for turning it into a CBE course

Back Up a Minute

Initially, I was wondering if we could take the entire masters program – of which this course is a part of – and make it CBE. But I thought that might be a bit much, and it presented a whole host of problems. The biggest one I saw right away was:

  • how do we handle teaching loads in a CBE situation?

One obvious way to handle it is to just keep courses on their normal timeline but make them competency based. I’ve done this before, and it’s not a big deal. But given that the masters program is online, it seems like we could really open this baby up and let her rip. Take down timelines. Or maybe set up some place holders like the degree needs to be completed (and all competencies mastered) within so many years of starting the program. But when you do that you cycle back to the question of teaching loads. The university has created a structure of what teaching looks like. CBE has the potential to really not work well within that structure.

Go Back to that Summer Course

I returned to just the idea of the summer course because it was a manageable thing that I could easily see getting accomplished. I thought….what if I could convince whoever is in charge to let me take the course (which is fully online) and run it as a CBE? The course could still launch in the summer if they needed it to, but we could give students a year to complete the competencies.

As far as my teaching load goes, well, this course would never count as part of my load because it’s supposed to be a summer course that I would be paid extra for. So let’s let it run for one full year. Give me the money you would give me had I taught it in the summer. I’ll stay on top of the students and check off their competencies earned as they complete them. I’ll organize the whole thing, and we can use it as a test run.

I have no idea if I can make this idea fly. But, for me, it solves the problem of who wants to teach the summer course AND it allows me to explore CBE.

Don’t Let the Problems Be Problems

I once had a phone conversation with a group of people who were very interested in developing online education courses. They wanted my input, and they hoped I would be a part of it. Now, I’m not saying I was full of brilliant ideas. But what did happen is I was met with reason after reason for why my ideas were too difficult to implement. Not that they were bad – just hard to do.

When I was thinking of CBE I was brought back to the realization of how universities structure teaching loads. That can make thinking about how to implement CBE challenging unless you confine it to a typical semester box. But, if you don’t want to do that, then don’t. Acknowledge the challenge and then work through it, work around it, but don’t let it be your brick wall.

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Online Courses: Lessons Learned (Part 2)

Last week, I wrote about how I have been taking two online courses and lessons I was learning as part of being a student in that context. Previously, I wrote about what I learned from taking the Twitter Masterminds course. Today, I want to share with you a lesson I have learned from being a part of the Edorble Academy.

What is Edorble?

I’ve written about Edorble when it was in its very early, Beta, stages (it’s since moved out of Beta mode). You can read more about it and get access to it here. In short, Edorble is a 3D world intended for educational purposes. The world you create is private to your group. They have a number of tools you can use that allow students to do things like engage in group chats and give presentations. Check it out to see what it’s all about.

What is the Edorble Academy?

The Edorble Academy offers courses about such topics as educational technology, online teaching, and gamification. It’s a relatively new addition to Edorble and content is still being developed. I signed up for a free course that recently launched called, “3D +VR (virtual reality) Technology in the Classroom.” As with Twitter Masterminds, I signed up because it met some professional goals of mine. However, I also used it as an opportunity to take the student perspective and see what I could learn that I could apply to my own online teaching.

Lesson Learned: Thoughts on Structured Release of Content

The Edorble class differed from Twitter Masterminds (TM) in its approach to releasing content. Where TM had all the content available to me immediately, Edorble’s class was intended to be four weeks long with content being released every Saturday morning. Like TM, Edorble has modules (they are just called sections), and each section has its own set of chapters. I can go back and forth between the sections. Once content is released it’s mine. The Edorble course had a more academic/school type feel to me. Probably because it was set up to be a four week course and so had a more semester like feel to me.

It was an interesting experience to contrast the TM approach of all content at once vs. Edorble’s release once a week for four weeks. TM probably has about the same amount of content as Edorble. Here are my thoughts:

  • Edorble’s approach was initially less overwhelming. I didn’t run around sifting through all the content at light speed, but I did sift through all the content I received and then went back to dive into particular aspects more deeply. As with TM, after I had settled into the course I basically did the content in the order it was presented unless I could articulate why I shouldn’t. I continue to assume the instructor orders things in a particular manner (probably a reasonable assumption; I know it’s what I do)
  • Being less overwhelming doesn’t make it better. It just makes it different. It’s simply something to notice. In both cases, I was overwhelmed to varying degrees but again, that’s not bad. It’s a good reminder that students likely experience this, it’s a normal emotion to experience, and it goes away as one becomes familiar with the content and structure.
  • In a typical college course, the expectation is to release the majority of the content all at once. Think about it…I give my students a syllabus that has all readings and assignments on it with due dates and what not. It’s not everything, but it’s a substantial portion of what they will be doing. It’s helpful because it allows students to plan how they want to approach their work and structure their time. But my experiences in these two courses have raised questions for me about the degree I should be giving more or less content away right off the bat in an online course. I have zero answers, but I am thinking about it.

Where I’m At With All This

As I write this, I am still working on identifying readings and just getting the basics done for my course. But I have plenty of time (sort of. I am moving across the country soon!). I plan to keep thinking about how content will be released in my course. I’m also still thinking about the idea that syllabi are written in a linear manner (understandable) and so as students we read and interact with them that way. This means that content, once it’s been “covered,” is often not returned to.

I’m thinking about this in two ways. First, I’m considering if there is a way to structure my syllabus so that it doesn’t promote linear engagement. Second, I’m considering if the standard structure is OK and that perhaps it’s more about how we ask and expect students to engage with it that promotes a linear engagement with it. For example, in my last post I discussed how my professional goals allowed me to pick and choose content. Those goals would take me back to content I had viewed in a previous module. Therefore, while the TM course was set up in a linear way, how I approached it allowed me to engage with it in a non-linear manner. How can I encourage this amongst my own students? I’ll get back to you.

One Year Ago

Two Years Ago

 

 

 

Taking An Online Course: Lessons Learned

While I am in the early stages of planning my online course, I am also in the middle of taking two of them! It made me wonder how many people who teach online courses have gotten the opportunity to take one? We’ve all taken plenty of face to face classes for years on end. Doing so has given us lots of opportunities to consider what we like or don’t like about that type of instruction. But I’m guessing most of us have had very limited opportunities to see what online classes look like and to experience different structures.

I didn’t seek out online classes because I wanted the experience of taking them. I happened to come across two that fit my professional needs and so I signed up for them. While I am learning content relevant to my needs in both courses, I am also taking the time to pay attention to how the instructors organize the courses and what kinds of experiences I get as a student. In today’s post I want to discuss some of the big ideas I have learned from one of them.

Background: The Twitter Masterminds

Twitter Masterminds is an online course developed by Mark Barnes (@markbarnes19 on twitter). The goal of the course is to help you become an expert at using twitter. This includes identifying relevant people to follow (and hopefully be followed by) and how to use twitter in more thoughtful and mindful ways.

I had found myself in a bit of a twitter rut. I enjoy using the tool. I’ve written a lot about how to use it in teaching. However, I was getting stuck in terms of finding good people to follow, building my followers, and I knew I wasn’t getting the most out of the tool. I took this course because I wanted to address these issues. FYI: It’s an amazing course, and I’ve gotten everything I wanted out of it and more. I’ll be reviewing it in a few weeks, but go here if you would like to take a closer look at it.

For the rest of this post, I want to talk to you about one of the big ideas I learned about how the course was structured and how I am thinking about it in terms of an academic/higher education context.

Self Paced: All The Content At Once

In Twitter Masterminds (TM), you get access to all the content at once. Having all the content at once is a bit like being turned loose in a candy store and saying you can eat anything you want however use please. While some things don’t look useful, most do. Most everything is exciting. You want it all, and you want it all at once.

Once I got over the fact that I had all this awesome, useful content available to me I calmed down and allowed myself to skim through it. I didn’t concentrate on anything too deeply at first. I allowed myself to flit in and out with no commitment. I didn’t focus on learning or using anything.

By giving myself time to play, I was able to understand what content was available to me and where I wanted to start my journey. Because all the content was available to me, and the course is self-paced, I was able to structure my experience however I wished. Although TM is structured around modules, and each module has multiple lessons, I could do the modules in any order I wanted and navigate back and forth as I saw fit.

For the most part, I made myself go through the modules in the order in which they were created. I assumed they were placed in that order for a specific reason. If I hit content I already knew or didn’t want to apply just yet then I skipped over it to return to later if needed.

What I Learned About Myself as a Student

Once I got settled into the TM course, I immediately identified a couple of skills I wanted to focus on developing in terms of getting better at twitter. At some point, I became aware that while I was actively applying what I had learned (and getting great benefit out of it!), I had stopped engaging with new content in the course. This is neither good nor bad. However, once I recognized this I started diving back into the modules (slowly) and working on learning more. I continued to apply what I was learning.

This structure of having all the content available is great if it is narrowly focused (which the course is; recall it’s focused on helping you become better at using twitter) and meets a specific need for the user (which of course it did for me or I would not have purchased it). Because I have learning goals, I could go into this space and utilize the teachings. I was also exposed to new ideas that I would never have thought of on my own.

My Take Aways for an Academic Course

In the TM course there is no deadline on learning. The course is mine to access forever. It’s just like if I went out and bought a book to help me learn something. In thinking about what I learned and how I might apply it to an academic course, I realized the following:

  • There is probably no need to release all the content at once. Doing so (to the tune of about 15 weeks worth of content) could be way overwhelming for any student. Releasing all the content at once around a very specific chunk of the course makes the most sense. TM has a good amount of content that is appropriate for the cost. An academic course would have significantly more content. A full release wouldn’t make sense (which got me thinking about how we release content in academic courses in general, but that is for another time).
  • Students need learning goals, and they need to set these for themselves. I came into the TM course with my own set of goals. The course helped me meet those goals as well as extend them. However, because I had my own goals I always felt empowered by how I approached the content and applied it. I usually ask my students what they want to learn in a course, but I never really do much with that information. I use it to get to know them better. If we are going to be studying something that links to one of their goals, I point it out. However, I don’t think it’s my job to do something with everyone’s goals. I do think I could do more to help students think about goal setting in ways that make sense for the course and empower them to realize them.
  • Having freedom to navigate the course and use the information to help me meet my goals was extremely helpful. So while I don’t think releasing all the content at once is the way to go for a 15 week academic course, I do think there’s something to consider here in terms of when and how people get access to content and helping them think about how they use it. I think people tend to use a syllabus in a linear manner, and I’d like to think about how to break that.

Next week I’ll be writing about lessons I have learned from a second online course I am taking. This course is structured much differently and my experiences with it are giving me a broader perspective on what it means to teach online.

One Year Ago

Two Years Ago

What Story Does Your Syllabus Tell?

Recently, a colleague of mine shared a a post with me, “Steps Towards a Big Idea Syllabus.” The larger blog that this seems to be a part of, My Teaching Notebook,  doesn’t seem to be getting regular updates. Too bad. It looks like it has tons of good content to sift through. However, read the post and go dig through the site. It’s worth your time..

The Big Idea post has really helped me in thinking about what I want my online courses for next year to be about. I’ll be teaching one course per semester, and both will be fully online. They are essentially masters courses in adolescent literacy. The idea is to get classroom teachers to think about what it means to develop literacy abilities of adolescent and how to teach them in ways that support it.

Previously, I noted that I had identified some great books I could use for the courses. This was still the case, but I had gotten stuck thinking through what I wanted students to learn. Enter the Big Idea post which states:

Start with Who not What:  “Who are my students and who do they need to become?” rather than “What content should I cover?”

Granted, I do not know my students at all. I’m currently not even living in the state they reside in. But I took this nugget of thinking about transformation and used it to launch my planning rather than stay hyper-focused on content and objectives (which I think get in the way anyways).

The author also talked about seeing your syllabus as a journey and explicitly creating a story line which you would then share with your students. I loved this idea, but I had no idea what story I wanted to tell. So I picked up one of the books I had identified – a more comprehensive text on adolescent literacy – and used it to launch my story.

What I Did

I first did some pretty traditional stuff. I had mapped out weeks for the course, and then I started organizing what chapters we might read from this one book for the fall semester. Since this is really a year long course, I decided to split the fall semester into two chunks. The first chunk would focus on the question, “Who are adolescent readers and writers?” and the second would address, “What is adolescent literacy.” I thought it would be important to understand adolescents as people first, and expand our understandings of their literacy practices, before tackling the concept of adolescent literacy. Once I knew what date ranges these questions would correspond with I then identified readings from the textbook.

story-2After I identified the readings, I began to write my story. The Big Idea post will show you an example, and I followed it. For each week, I had one-two sentences that told my story. In two cases we spent two weeks with the same story line. I ended up only writing the story line for the first half of the semester before I needed a break. Here it is:

Adolescent Literacy: Understanding Who Adolescents Are & What Their Literacy Practices Look Like

Week One: Adolescents’ culture and identities influence how they engage with reading and writing and shape their experiences in school.

Weeks Two and Three: Their culture and identities lead them to engage with a variety of literacy practices often not sanctioned by schools.

Week Four: Families and communities often shape and enhance both academic and personal (out-of-school) literacy practices.

Weeks Five and Six: Some students have drastically different experiences in school based on their culture, language, and how schools identify and position them.

Changing the Readings

While I found the book helpful in getting my story launched (remember this is a new course for me; if I was doing this with a course I knew well I could probably craft a story line right now based on the last syllabus), when I was done I realized I didn’t need the book in it’s entirety. Once I had the story mapped out, I could see where some chapters from the text would make sense but now I had a much better plan for identifying other readings. I also reordered some things as I wrote the story. The initial lay out that I thought made sense – in terms of topics and what we would focus on – worked better with some reordering based on the story I want my students to experience.

What’s Next

Next up will be finishing the story for the semester. I’ll then start to work a little bit on identifying readings that fit in with the story. From there, I will expand out to assignments and additional support structures an online course will require. I hope to have the story completed to share in my next post.

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Deciding the Content

Recently, I explained that starting in the fall I would be teaching fully online for the 2017-2018 academic year. My first thought was about how I would foster community. However, once I got past that I realized that I needed to back up and think about the content first. Community is incredibly important for the class, but I can return to it another day (plus it’s always spinning around in the back of my head anyways).

Start With What You Know

I was excited to finally be able to teach fully online. However, that excitement quickly gave way to feeling overwhelmed. Where do I start? While I had the question about building community in my class, it seemed like the most reasonable place to start was making decisions about what I was actually going to teach/wanted students to learn.

That’s right. Just start old school style. No point in getting fancy when we don’y even know what we’re gonna be teaching over here.

I have the syllabi from the previous instructor. This is, of course, immensely helpful. But I don’t have to do it exactly the way she did. In fact, I assume they hired me because I would put my own spin on things. But. I am starting with the basics here. I’ve ordered five or six books from a few publishers that are on the way. I’m sure at least some of them will work for the course and help me refine what I want to teach and when. Because this course is really a course in two parts (spans across the year), I am not feeling constricted.

Having the Year To Teach

The idea that I have a year with students to cover a broad topic (in my case adolescent literacy) is very unique. I’m told that I should expect to have the same students for both classes. While students have to register individually for both classes (fall and spring), I can view the spring class as a continuation of the fall class.

You can view the spring class any number of ways:

  • as a continuation of topics (improve breadth)
  • an opportunity to go deeper into topics and perhaps extend breadth a bit
  • pretend these boundaries don’t exist and seriously play with competency based education

Yes, boundaries do exist between the courses, but they are artificial. It’s the typical semester divide. The course number changes between fall and spring. But, particularly in this case, who says I have to work within that structure?

Thinking about Competency Based Education

I haven’t gotten too far down this path yet because the first step is for me to decide what the course objectives are and what students need to learn. Given that I’m waiting on books to arrive (and my current job takes priority) this will move at a slightly slower pace. But that’s ok. I’ve got time. I think it is possible here to create a master syllabus that

content creationImagine if you had an academic year and could focus on students demonstrating competencies. You want, of course, for your students to demonstrate that they have learned specific things, and that’s what competencies are intended to do. I could see how I could identify a number of things for students to demonstrate. Within a given competency, I could provide students the opportunity to go deeper (this is a way to level a competency to use a gamification principle). It’s not that you have to be advanced on every competency, but I could see how getting a particular grade would require some competencies to be at a basic level and others at a more advanced one. Students could then have options.

You could do this inside a semester. There’s obviously a very definitive deadline for students to demonstrate what they have learned. I could start all over again with different competencies in the second semester even though it’s an extension (Part 2) of the previous one.

Ok. That’s an option to consider, but I kinda like something else….

What if students were presented with all the competencies for the entire year at once. For this class, a masters class with teachers in it, this is actually a very reasonable approach. You can work on a given competency as it makes sense for you and your students. For example, if I have you working on how to teach vocabulary in the spring that’s fine, but maybe you really needed that in the fall. Well now you can pick and choose, go back and forth, as it makes sense for you as the student.

But What About Grading?

Of course these classes still sit inside a traditional university system. At the end of each semester I still have to award everyone a grade. This is simple actually. All I have to do is make a particular grade (A, B, C, etc…) about competencies learned in general. I don’t say you have to have completed XYZ competencies. Instead, I might say that you have to complete a specific number each semester (the student chooses). To get a specific grade, a certain amount of those competencies would have to be more advanced – a higher level if you will – than others. I think this is actually pretty easy.

The Downfall

I’m sure there are multiple downfalls, but the one that popped in my head first was the fact that I will teach this course every other year. What that means is that any cleaning up and revising I want to do based on Year 1 won’t happen until I’m in Year 3 at my position. I don’t like that so much because I like to make changes/revisions in my courses while they are fresh and useful. However, I am thinking about how I can take what I develop and put it into an online platform that would be useful for others outside the university. This allows me to continue to develop the course while offering others an opportunity to dip in and take what they like. It’s a thought worth exploring.

One Year Ago

Two Years Ago